Review: The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit by Graham Joyce

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About The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit

David, a college student, takes a summer job at a run-down family resort in a dying English resort town. This is against the wishes of his family because it was at this resort that David’s biological father disappeared fifteen years earlier–but something undeniable has called David there.

Something different is happening in this town. David is haunted by eerie visions of a mysterious man carrying a rope, walking hand-in-hand with a small child, and the resort is under siege by a plague of ladybugs. When David gets embroiled in a fiercely torrid love triangle, the stakes turn more and more menacing, and through it all, David feels as though he is getting closer to the secrets of his own past.

My Review

I enjoyed the period depicted. I was also fond of David, he’s nondescript yet fascinating. He’s invisible but visible. His plainness is what I find appealing, apparently others in the narrative as well. His vulnerability and innocence endearing. Other characters were memorable in their motley way.

The narrative skims the 1970’s, Britain’s dying seaside resort business, the recession, the hottest summer, and the National Front which is grand, however, the minimal length prevents from delving into further, as is you are merely given a gloss over, nothing to dig your teeth into or make a substantial impression in the plot.

The paranormal aspects, the imaginative along with nightmares were well done, perfect amount without becoming a distraction or commanding. Loose ends coming together in the end.

The length is the handicap, more elaboration would have been welcomed in order to explain the neglected areas in a better fashion as it stands it feels rushed and untidy.

Offbeat coming of age story running the gamete of love, high and lows, fear, family secrets.

About Graham Joyce25027

Graham Joyce (22 October 1954 – 9 September 2014) was an English writer of speculative fiction and the recipient of numerous awards for both his novels and short stories.

After receiving a B.Ed. from Bishop Lonsdale College in 1977 and a M.A. from the University of Leicester in 1980. Joyce worked as a youth officer for the National Association of Youth Clubs until 1988. He subsequently quit his position and moved to the Greek islands of Lesbos and Crete to write his first novel, Dreamside. After selling Dreamside to Pan Books in 1991, Joyce moved back to England to pursue a career as a full-time writer.

Graham Joyce resided in Leicester with his wife, Suzanne Johnsen, and their two children, Joseph and Ella. He taught Creative Writing to graduate students at Nottingham Trent University from 1996 until his death, and was made a Reader in Creative Writing.

Joyce died on 9 September 2014. He had been diagnosed with lymphoma in 2013.

Published August 5th 2014 by Doubleday

 

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